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Sunol Regional Wilderness

Originally Ohlone territory, Sunol Regional Wilderness was a working ranch for over a century. Unlike a typical designated wilderness, cattle grazing continues on the land. However, outdoor recreation opportunities abound in this gorgeous spot that feels worlds away from the bustle of the East Bay. Comprising 6,858 acres, it was established as a park in 1962 and is administered by the East Bay Regional Park District.

The 10 Essentials

ACTIVITIES:

  • backpacking
  • bird-watching
  • camping
  • equestrian
  • hiking
  • mountain biking
  • picnicking
  • trail running

HIGHLIGHTS:

12.3 miles of multi-use trails ranging from easy to difficult

Backcountry & group camping facilities

Picnic areas with barbecues available

Glorious views of the Bay Area

HABITAT:

Coastal sage & scrub; riparian along Alameda Creek

AVAILABILITY:

Open year-round; day-use only unless you are camping with an advance reservation. Check park website for open hours, as they vary throughout the year.
Ideal any time, especially during the cool and shoulder seasons.

AMENITIES:

Visitor Center (the ‘Green Barn’) with interpretive displays and gift shop

Full program of naturalist education and walks
Reservable group picnic areas, and multiple first-come picnic sites
Equestrian parking / staging area

Bathrooms & trash cans

PERMITS / FEES:

No permits required unless you are camping or continuing onto the Ohlone Wilderness Trail via the adjacent lands administered by the San Francisco Water Department.
Fees are collected for parking ($5/car) and non-service dogs ($2) on designated days / seasons.

SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS:

Some or all of this unit is included in the Mount Hamilton Range (East Diablo Range) Audubon Important Bird Area

ACCESSIBILITY:

Kid-friendly
Dog-friendly
ADA: Accessible developed features; there are paved roads and some hard-packed flat trails near the main parking area.
Transit: N/A

NEAREST SERVICES:

Fremont (to the west) is the nearest full-service city.

HEADS-UP!

There is no potable water on-site. Use of BBQ pits may be restricted during times of high fire danger.

Risks include: poison oak, rattlesnakes, ticks.
Tarantula breeding season is late summer – fall for extra squick factor!

Flora & Fauna

178 bird species have been sighted within this park, and there are hundreds of plant species as well!
In addition to the species typical to these habitats, you may also see:

  • Oakland star-tulip
  • Diablo Helianthella
  • Long-eared owl
  • Golden eagle
  • Western pond turtles
  • California mountain lion
Sunol
59°
Fair
6:15am8:12pm PDT
Feels like: 57°F
Wind: 6mph SW
Humidity: 90%
Pressure: 29.97"Hg
UV index: 0
TueWedThu
77/57°F
70/57°F
81/55°F

hike sunol!

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